Beer Haiku Friday and Fizzy Yellow Beer Drinking Ninnies

A clever little poem for today called “The Perfect Hobby“:

The perfect hobby
For people that like to clean
Must be homebrewing

Over at the Malthouse blog, my latest post covers the worst beer slogan in the world, Bud Light, geat American craft beers, a beer which gets in your face, a beer which gets 90 additions of hops and a bear fighting a lion. It is called “‘Fizzy yellow beer drinking ninnies’ need not read on“:

The Dogfish Head crew make “off-centred beers for off-centred people” and Malthouse is now offering their 60 Minute and 90 Minute ales. The 60 Minute IPA is continuously hopped. There are over 60 hop additions during the sixty minute boil – a hint, perhaps, about the name. Terrifyingly, they describe this 6%, 60 IBU hop-rocket as a “session” IPA.

Which it actually is when compared to the Dogfish Head 90 Minute Imperial Pale Ale. The brewers here use both the continuous hopping process and a device they call “Me so Hoppy” (basically an inert gas fired closed loop dry hopping system – watch the video below) to create this 9% 90 IBU beast of a beer. There is also an even bigger 120 Minute ale out there but it is unclear whether it can safely travel across international waters without spontaneous hop explosions.

Glass Tips – Those wonderful tipplers at Beer Haiku Daily and the Malthouse Blog

Beer Haiku Monday and the People’s Blog Part Deux

While the seasons are wrong for this hemisphere, the poem still resonates. It is called “Winterizing“:

Taking the sails down
could go quicker without beer
but what fun is that

Over at Malthouse blog, the popular People’s blog returns with two more guest columnists and some considered reflections on bloggers and blogging. It is titled “The People’s Blog Part Deux“:

Ten years later, even hardened net geeks are giving up on trying to figure out how many blogs there really are. The answer is well over 100 million, almost certainly a lot, lot more. Blogging is not just for pyjama-clad Generation Xer’s who live in their parents basement anymore (though they are certainly still well represented on-line.) Now, rock stars blog. Beer writers blog. Businesses blog. Scientists blog. Even politicians blog.

Glass Tips – Beer Haiku Daily and Malthouse Blog

Beer Haiku Friday and Making Love in a Canoe

Today’s haiku combines three of my favourite topics (beer, poetry and Homer Simpson) into just 17 glorious syllables. It is called “Homer Haiku“:

Cause and solution
Of life’s infinite problems
Poured in a pint glass

The latest Malthouse blog also covers more of my favourite subjects – American pale ale, US foreign policy, Sierra Nevada – and some of my less favourite topics – Bud Light, Urkel and Oprah – in just one post “American beer is like making love in a canoe“:

American beers have an appalling reputation internationally based on the fact that 80% of them are, in fact, nonsense on stilts. This was certainly the reputation that Monty Python was lampooning in the line which now serves as the title of this blog post. However, that same accusation of mainstream mediocrity can be levelled at a number of countries around the world. Often a nation’s most popular or most famous beer is hardly their best offering. Both those generalisations apply fully to New Zealand.

Glass Tip – Beer Haiku Daily and Malthouse Blog

Sierra Nevada New Zealand Fresh Hop Ale

Sierra Nevada, the pioneer of fresh hop ales in America, has expanded its Harvest Ale Series with the release of another ground-breaking product introduction, Southern Hemisphere Harvest Ale. This marks the first time in known history that a fresh hop ale has been available in America in the spring since hops are harvested in the fall in the northern hemisphere. The inaugural ale will debut in early May.

To make this project happen, Sierra Nevada traveled to New Zealand to harvest fresh hops, and then transported them from the southern hemisphere to Chico where they were immediately used in brewing. Like their award-winning Celebration Ale, the fresh hops in this beer are dried right after being picked then shipped immediately to Chico for brewing, so that they retain their peak aromatics and flavors. Freshly harvested hops are richer in hop oils so they impart more hop aroma and hop spiciness into beer.

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