Who Are These NZ Breweries Entering World Beer Cup?

So I got a press release from the Brewers Guild of New Zealand today about the New Zealand Breweries that entered the World Beer Cup. I’d like to find out more about the following breweries, so if you know anything please share. I do know Williams Warn, but unsure of the rules and how a home-brew equipment manufacture can entered a commercial beer awards. Any additional information or commentary you have would be great if you could share.

Who are these companies, what beers have they entered?

  • New Zealand Beer Ltd (Auckland)
  • The Fox Sporting Bar & Restaurant (Auckland)
  • WilliamsWarn (Auckland)
  • BrewStation (Auckland)
  • Long White Cloud Brewing

COMMENTS HERE!!

MEDIA RELEASE

6 April 2016

Kiwi breweries fizzing for beer’s own “Olympics”

As the world’s best athletes finalise their preparations for this year’s Olympic Games, Kiwi brewers will be going for gold at their own Olympics, the World Beer Cup, in Philadelphia next month.

The biennial World Beer Cup, known as the “Olympics of Beer Competitions”, is the most prestigious beer competition in the world.  This year, 11 New Zealand breweries will compete against more than 2000 rivals from 63 countries for gold, silver and bronze medals.

The New Zealand breweries competing are:

  • Epic Brewing Company (Auckland)
  • Garage Project (Wellington)
  • Harrington’s Breweries (Christchurch)
  • LION (Auckland)
  • Long White Cloud Brewing
  • Moa Brewing Company (Marlborough)
  • ParrotDog (Wellington)
  • New Zealand Beer Ltd (Auckland)
  • The Fox Sporting Bar & Restaurant (Auckland)
  • WilliamsWarn (Auckland)
  • BrewStation (Auckland)

Brewers Guild of New Zealand president Emma McCashin said New Zealand breweries were highly regarded by their international peers.

“New Zealand has an incredibly proud tradition and talent for brewing. Each year the quality and range of styles being produced in New Zealand is getting better and Kiwi brewers punch well above their weight at beer awards around the world.

“It’s no wonder that New Zealand is enjoying a golden era in brewing.”

The World Beer Cup was the pinnacle of brewing excellence, McCashin said.

“The World Beer Cup is pretty unique in that there are medals only for first, second and third in each category. When there are literally thousands of high-quality entries from around the world across 90 different categories, getting a medal means you’re a member of world brewing’s elite.”

Only three New Zealand breweries have tasted success at the World Beer Cup.

LION won silver with its Speight’s Triple Hop Pilsner in 2014, with Wellington’s Garage Project also picking up silver with its Cockswain’s Courage Double Barreled Edition Porter the same year. Monteith’s Black Beer won bronze in 2000.

But the stellar growth and development of New Zealand’s $2.2 billion beer industry meant more global success was already brewing.

“The beers being produced here are already considered among the world’s best. We’ve got tremendous talent among the thousands of people involved in the brewing industry, from malt and hops production right through to bottling and distribution.

“It’s not just the great-tasting beers New Zealand breweries produce, New Zealand hops is in huge demand overseas, particularly on the West Coast of the United States. What we’re seeing now are huge opportunities in Asia, which is the next big export frontier for Kiwi brewing.”

In addition to the New Zealand breweries competing, a record number of New Zealand brewing experts will be taking part at the event as judges: Kelly Ryan and Colin Mallon (Fork & Brewer, Wellington), Stephen Plowman (Hallertau, Auckland), Joseph Wood (Liberty Brewing, Auckland), Greig McGill (Brewaucracy, Hamilton), Brian Watson (Good George, Hamilton), Shane Morley (Steam Brewing, Auckland) and Geoff Griggs (beer writer, Blenheim).

For further information about the World Beer Cup: http://www.worldbeercup.org/

Craft beer industry growth fuelling demand for skilled brewers

MEDIA RELEASE
29 February 2016

Craft beer industry growth fuelling demand for skilled brewers

Kelly and Luke in BreweryAttracting and retaining highly-skilled brewers is the vital next step in continuing the growth trajectory of New Zealand’s brewing industry, says the Brewers Guild of New Zealand.

Already a $2.2 billion industry in this country, growth in the number of professional brewing operations has continued in response increasing thirst for Kiwi beer overseas.

That growth has put the heat on breweries to recruit and retain skilled personnel, said Brewers Guild president Emma McCashin.

“The number of professional brewing operations in New Zealand has almost trebled in the past five years, and beer exports have almost doubled.

“As the industry’s growth continues to trend upward, there’s definitely a pressing need and demand for more highly-skilled people throughout the value chain, starting with more professional brewers.

“There isn’t necessarily a skills shortage currently but there’s increasing pressure on breweries to recruit the people they need to grow their operations and meet demand for consistently excellent beer, as well as continuing to innovate and experiment.”

ANZ’s 2015 industry insight report showed the craft beer business had grown 40 per cent from 2014. Of New Zealand’s more than 100 craft breweries, a third were either readying for or already pursuing offshore market opportunities. The thirst for Kiwi craft beer continues to boom in the United States, while demand in Asian markets is tipped to grow 300% in the next decade.

Those New Zealand breweries with export aspirations would need to expand production to take advantage of the opportunities, said Mrs McCashin. The Brewers Guild was currently investigating a number of initiatives aimed at attracting more people to the industry.

“Craft brewing in New Zealand may have started out as a cottage industry but, in the past couple of decades, it’s grown into a highly sophisticated and valuable sector.

“To continue that trend and achieve the scale required by the industry, we need to get more highly-skilled people involved. We’ve already got some of the best brewers in the world making beer here and overseas, but we need even more of them to keep pace with growth.

“That involves finding ways to attract more people from food science, chemistry, microbiology and even engineering backgrounds.”

Given the global interest in beer and brewing, the professional opportunities were impressive, she said.

“Beer is by far the most widely consumed alcoholic beverage in the world and consumer demand for premium beers in particular is growing at a phenomenal rate. With that comes strong demand for skilled New Zealand brewers from breweries all around the world.”

–END–

About the Brewers Guild of New Zealand

The Brewers Guild is a membership-based organisation established to grow the value and quality of New Zealand’s $2.2 billion beer sector.

The Guild’s mission is to grow the value and quality of the New Zealand beer sector and to act with vision for the future of the New Zealand brewing industry through education, training and communication.

The Guild organises New Zealand’s most prestigious annual beer awards, the Brewers Guild of New Zealand Awards.

For more information visit http://www.brewersguild.org.nz/

Moa Shareholders Will Be Sad :-(

A few days ago I wrote about Moa and their latest Annual Results. There have been a few articles analysing these results (see below), and commentary from the investment industry.

Since then Moa shares have continued to drop on the back of sharebrokers downgrading their recommendation on Moa stock from “neutral” to “underperform

Moa Sour BlancThe questions the media have raised seem to be around:

When they run out of money what happens next?
– do the existing shareholders get called on for more cash?
– will there be another issuing of shares, diluting current shareholders?
– will it be debt that is taken on to continue fund the company?
– will the Business Bakery and Pioneer Capital provide funds as a loan?

How will the new brewery be funded? Are they even going to build a brewery?

Will the main shareholders the Business Bakery and Pioneer Capital turn around, make an offer and buy out all shares and delist the company?

Will Moa merge with Stoke and Hancock’s to form the largest craft brewery in New Zealand? Or even Tuatara?

The questions I am currently thinking about:

With many people having Moa as their top of mind “craft / boutique brewery” in New Zealand does their current predicament and negative media attention cast a shadow over the whole craft beer industry?

Has this ultimately reduce the appetite of the public to invest in the (craft) brewing industry in New Zealand. i.e. if a brewery wanted to do an IPO, would they now be overly cautious and less likely to invest in a craft brewery, based on Moa’s performance?

On the flip side, even though we are seeing this negative angle, does it really matter as Moa have pretty much single-handedly raised awareness about breweries and craft beer in New Zealand to the general public. As much as the beer geeks might hate on them, the mainstream beer drinker in New Zealand now thinks about beer as more than just Lion and DB now.

Taking it to a random place, should the industry rally together and support each other to raise the awareness of craft beer which includes Moa. Do we (craft brewers) all have more to lose if they fall from grace in the eye of the public? Maybe this is something the Brewers Guild of New Zealand discuss on behalf of its members.

 

Moa shares tumble to new low
– 3:42 PM Thursday May 29, 2014

Shares in Moa Group, which raised $16 million when it went public in 2012, plunged to almost a third of its listing price after the boutique beer maker posted a wider full-year loss

“If you look at their cashflow statement they appear to be some way away from generating positive cashflow.”

Moa “unappetising” – analyst
– 1:00 PM Wednesday May 28, 2014

Sharebroker Forsyth Barr has downgraded its view on Moa Group, saying the company is an “unappetising investment case” and is expected to burn through its remaining cash reserves over the next 12 months, which may lead to a capital raising.

“However, we continue to struggle with the investment case in light of slow growth in key offshore markets and a trend towards lower margin products.”

Moa has turned a corner: boss
– 5:00 AM Wednesday May 28, 2014

“The company is looking at a range of financing alternatives and timing, and we will keep the market abreast of plans as soon as they are finalised,”