Monteith’s celebrates 140 years with 1860s brew

Monteith’s has been crafting fine beers for 140 years. And to celebrate the milestone, the iconic West Coast brewer is releasing a special brew in a style that was popular way back in the 1860s.

This strictly limited release brewed exclusively at the Monteith’s Brewery Company in Greymouth, West Coast.

“Monteith’s 140 West Coast Pale Ale is a true New Zealand premium ale,” says brewer Barrie Calder. “It’s brewed with New Zealand-grown Cascade hops giving it a striking citrus-pine hop aroma.

It has an alcohol content of 5.2 per cent. Recommended retail price for a four pack is $ 13.99.

3 thoughts on “Monteith’s celebrates 140 years with 1860s brew”

  1. I do need to raise the questions of the follow statement“a true New Zealand premium ale”true meaning not false?premium meaning not budget?What is it meant to mean?“Monteith’s 140 West Coast Pale Ale is a true New Zealand premium ale,” says brewer Barrie Calder. “It’s brewed with New Zealand-grown Cascade hops giving it a striking citrus-pine hop aroma. “Having now tasted it I can officially say my tasted buds have been destroyed by too much Epic beer, as the Cascade character was far from striking, actually I struggled to find it. Then again as far as flavour intensity I am at the bleeding edge on a New Zealand scale.What I do love is that a four pack cost $13.99 finally beer priced where it should be.This equates to $20.99 which makes Epic Pale Ale good value for money at $18.99

  2. Luke, I’m interested to know why you don’t post your comments in the main body of the post? Also, my take: True, meaning accurate to tradition. Premium, of excellent quality (hence your price point).

  3. Agree 100% on the pricing. One of the hardest things to get past with “converting the masses” is the price point. If mainstream beer suddenly jumps up to craft beer pricing, that last hurdle goes away, and all you’re really left with as serious arguments are ignorance (can be fixed) and tradition (can be accommodated).I hate the term premium also. It’s another bit of the English language co-opted to infer “quality” when all it usually means in a practical sense is “costs more”. If anyone can tell me what makes Steinlager “premium”, I’d love to hear it.

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